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26 07, 2019

Unprecedented Heat Bakes Europe Shattering All-Time Records

2019-07-26T17:57:22+10:00

Europe is in the midst of one of the most vile and unprecedented, dangerous heatwaves the region has ever experienced with multiple countries shattering long standing, all-time temperature records. Above image – Temperatures for 4pm Thursday across Holland. Image via Weerplaza.

We (as Australian’s) love to make fun of Europeans, especially the Poms, for complaining about the heat when it gets into the mid 20’s. This however, would still be classed as a dangerous heatwave in Australia and its affecting countries that cant cope with it. 

An extremely hot airmass is moving through Europe at the moment and surging ridiculous heat across large parts of Europe. During Wednesday and Thursday, Holland (The Netherlands) saw maximums reach 39ºc and 41ºc respectively. This shattered the old all-time record of 38ºc and was the first time ever the country experienced a 40ºc day. Belgium has recorded back to back 40ºc days on both Wednesday and Thursday as well – this is the first time ever that the country has experienced a 40ºc temperature. Unofficial reports from both Holland and Belgium came through with temperatures nudging 42-44ºc in some areas. Before anyone wants to criticise them for complaining – this is about double their average for Summer (Amsterdam averages around 20ºc for July) – so for an unfair comparison, 20ºc above average puts Brisbane on a 51ºc January day… and Brisbanites would have ever right to complain with that. Germany has seen 25 individual locations crack the 40ºc mark with some up around 42-43ºc… prior to this heatwave, Germany had only recorded 40ºc once in its history, that record has been shattered. 

Temperatures across Paris and France in general during Thursday which saw multiple locations shatter all-time records. Image via Meteociel.

London didn’t escape the heat either. Cambridge topped at 38.1ºc, which broke the July record but fell just short of the all-time record for the UK set in August. London pushed the mid to high 30’s as well with unofficial temperatures of between 39 & 41ºc coming out of London leading to many workers sent home. Paris saw maximums climb to 43ºc, shattering the old all-time record of 40.4ºc with large parts of Spain and France climbing into the mid 40’s for the 2nd time this Summer. 

Temperatures across the United Kingdom during Thursday which saw multiple locations reach 15-20ºc above average for Summer. Image via Meteociel.

 

Temperatures are expected to climb into the high 30’s and low 40’s once again across The Netherlands, Germany, Belgium and France. Further temperatures in the mid to high 30’s are expected over Southern and Central Spain and London may push 30ºc again. European homes are designed to KEEP THE HEAT IN. They are double bricked, and while 80% of Australian’s have air conditioning… only 3% of European homes have air con. The heat is drawn in and trapped. This helps them survive the brutal Winter’s that Australians will never experience. The heat has sparked many out of control wildfires across many Countries with an excessive amount of heat related illness cases being reported. 

Temperatures are expected to cool off over the weekend gradually as a low pressure system moves in off the Ocean and helps produce rain and storms to various regions over a number of days into next week. 

Generalised overview of temperatures across Europe for Friday where further mid to high 30’s are expected (grey & dark red colours), with 40ºc+ possible again across the Netherlands, Belgium & Germany. Image via Windy.

 

Unprecedented Heat Bakes Europe Shattering All-Time Records2019-07-26T17:57:22+10:00
25 07, 2019

Cold Front #2 Impacting TAS & VIC Tonight

2019-07-25T19:45:50+10:00

Issued July 25, 2019. The second cold front for the week is expected to slowly make its way across TAS and possibly Southern VIC tonight (Thursday night) and into Friday morning, bringing additional rain and some snow to mostly Tasmania. Above image 24hr rainfall for TAS via Windy. Green >10mm. 

CLICK HERE TO GAIN ACCESS TO VIC, NSW & ACT MEMBERS MAPS INC. SNOW MAPS

A weak cold front is expected to move across the Eastern Bight during Thursday night and impact Tasmania during the early hours of Friday morning and potentially extending up across Southern VIC during Friday morning as well. The front should move through Tasmania during Friday morning before moving into the Tasman Sea later on Friday. This front is expected to bring additional rainfall to Western TAS overnight, where falls of 10-20mm are expected, with lighter falls likely over the Eastern half of the State including Hobart which may see less than a few mm most likely. Strong winds are likely, as with all cold fronts, but gusts should mostly remain below damaging thresholds outside of the Snowy Mountains / Victorian Alps and elevated parts of TAS / exposed Coastal areas over the West and South Coast.

Forecast winds for the early hours of Friday morning – Pink >60km/h. Image via Windy.

 

While snow is a common commodity with cold fronts, the mid and upper level air cooling that is required for snowfall is expected to be dragging well behind the front. So its likely, that even though snow is expected down to around 800m, it might be very patchy over Tasmania with very light falls expected at best. Snow is expected to fall to around 1300-1400m over the Snowy Mountains with very light falls also expected – arguably there is potentially better snow potential over VIC than TAS due to some mid level cooling lingering over the Alpine prior to the main cold airmass arriving. 

Forecast temperatures at 1000m ASL (850mb). Blue colouring indicates temperatures cold enough for Snow. This shows the colder air is lagging well behind the cold front. Image via Windy.

 

Cold Front #2 Impacting TAS & VIC Tonight2019-07-25T19:45:50+10:00
23 07, 2019

Blizzards & Low Level Snow Forecast For SE AUS Tuesday Night

2019-07-23T18:48:50+10:00

The first of 4 cold fronts to sweep across SE Australia this week is expected to impact Victoria, Tasmania and Southern NSW including the ACT tonight (Tuesday night into Wednesday morning) bringing heavy rain, strong to damaging winds, blizzards and snow. Above image – Wind gusts for Wednesday morning via Windy, blue/aqua >90km/h.

CLICK HERE FOR HIGHI DETAIL FORECASTS AND MAPPING FOR NSW, ACT & VIC

The first of 4 moderate to strong cold fronts this week is expected to sweep across the South Eastern sector of Australia during Tuesday night and into Wednesday morning. This cold front is expected to bring with it a band of showers and rain periods with intermittent thunder (which we have already seen across VIC and Bass Strait today) along with strong winds. As the system moves through, damaging winds are expected to increase across Alpine areas which will also likely coincide with snow developing – leading to likely blizzard conditions. As there is only a short window of opportunity for snow, snow will be highly limited to the peaks of the Alpine resorts – but 10-20cm is still possible, with some models even indicating that 30cm cant be ruled out which is pretty good for an overnight dumping by Australian standards.

 

Across Tasmania, the winds aren’t expected to be as volatile, but upper level temperatures are likely to be much colder. This will likely produce snow down to around 400-500m during Tuesday night and into early Wednesday morning before rising to 700m later on Wednesday morning. The best falls are expected to be over the Central Highlands likely also, but with snow levels down to around 400m – its possible that some flurries may occur over the Hobart Hills and areas surrounding the Lenah Valley.  

Snow forecast via Windy showing reasonable falls across the Tasmanian Highlands and Snowy Mountains

 

Blizzards & Low Level Snow Forecast For SE AUS Tuesday Night2019-07-23T18:48:50+10:00
22 07, 2019

Warm Winter Week Coming Up For QLD

2019-07-22T18:32:38+10:00

A series of slow moving, large and dominating high pressure regions are expected to create a much warmer the normal week across QLD this upcoming week. Above image: OCF Forecast maximums for Tuesdays across SEQLD via BSCH.

CLICK HERE TO BECOME A HIGGINS STORM CHASING PREMIUM SUBSCRIBER

 

After a warm Monday, temperatures are expected to only continue to rise across Queensland during the next week. This has been brought on by a series of slow moving, large and dominating high pressure regions which are expected to move across mainland Australia during the next 7 days. These high’s are expected to be relentless and lead to continuous fine and sunny days across the majority of the State. Light winds will also lead to minimal influence on the overall temperature which is expected to climb State-wide to above average for the entire week.

A pressure and wind map off Windy, showing a large high still dominating Eastern AUS (and QLD) on Friday.

 

 

OCF Forecast Maximums for Queensland on Thursday via BSCH

 

Across the South East of the State, maximums are expected to hover around the mid 20’s for much of the week with some locations pushing the high 20’s or maybe even 30ºc on Tuesday. This is well and truly above the average for July which sits around the upper teens / low 20’s depending on the location. Across much of the remainder of the State, maximums are likely to be in the mid to high 20’s, possibly pushing the low 30’s depending on the exact location – this will be around 3-5ºc above average for July standards. Due to various reasons, overnight minimums will struggle to plummet as seen last week – especially across Southern and South East QLD. 

This doesn’t mean its the end of Winter by any stretch, its just a warmer week. We are only entering the peak of Winter now, so Winter lovers still have something to look forward to.

OCF Forecast Maximums for Queensland on Sunday via BSCH

 

Warm Winter Week Coming Up For QLD2019-07-22T18:32:38+10:00
22 07, 2019

Wet & Windy Week Forecast For Tasmania

2019-07-22T12:46:12+10:00

Tasmania is expected to bare the brunt of the weather over the next week as a series of cold fronts impacts the State bringing strong to damaging winds, heavy rain, storms and snow. Above image 5 day rainfall via Windy showing 50mm+ in orange, 25mm+ in yellow.

 

 

During the course of the next week, a series of cold fronts are expected to sweep across Tasmania late on Monday, overnight Thursday into Friday, another on Friday and then Saturday.These cold fronts are expected to bring typical Winter weather to the State with showers and rain periods coinciding with the passing of each cold front, as well as lingering showers in between fronts as an onshore flow trails in behind – feeding moisture in off the Bight and waters North of Antarctica across the State. There is the chance of some storms associated with each cold front as well, as warmer air ahead of the fronts interacts with increased moisture and cooler air behind them. Across the course of the next 5 days (Monday through to Friday) this should lead to falls of 30-60mm becoming likely across the Western and Northern regions of the State, but unfortunately rainfall is expected to be very limited over the South East of TAS courtesy of the Mt Wellington rain shadow.

 

 

Each front is expected to also bring with it strong to locally damaging winds of 60-100km/h (the higher gusts will be over open Coastal areas on the West and South Coast as well as elevated terrain). Snowfall is expected to be fairly limited as there are no major upper level systems associated with any of these fronts. So falls of 10-20cm are expected to be the peak falls over the Central Highlands during the week. 

While this is ‘just normal’ for this time of year. There isn’t much else happening around the Country as multiple large high pressure regions dominate the mainland. This could lead to some frost, but in terms of inclement or severe weather – Tasmania holds the keys this week.

 

Forecast Snowfall for TAS during the Monday (Jul 21) to Friday (Jul 25) period. Image via Windy

 

Wet & Windy Week Forecast For Tasmania2019-07-22T12:46:12+10:00
22 07, 2019

Know Your District! (Western Australia)

2019-07-22T00:39:55+10:00

When it comes to severe weather, regardless of the type of the scenario, one of the age old questions we receive on Higgins Storm Chasing, as well as any other weather page across the globe is ‘Will this affect me at x”. Generally ‘districts’ or much broader areas are labelled rather than specific towns. This is largely due to weather being unpredictable down to the nearest town and weather systems being quite large which means their potential is spread over hundreds of kilometres. Its also due to there sometimes being so many town, that the list would be far too long for it to be beneficial. Some setups or systems are easier to predict than others, but even in those situations, districts or parts of a district (i.e Northern WA, South West WA or Inland WA) are labelled. Above image is a base image from Weatherzone.

Western Australia 2 divisions which are divided evenly into 7 forecast districts each according to the Bureau of Meteorology. These districts along with SOME of their respective towns include (Obviously not all towns are named, but if you recognise a nearby town, then chances are you are included in that district):
Mining & Pastoral:
1 – Kimberley: Broome, Fitzroy Crossing, Halls Creek, Wyndham, Troughton Island, Kalumburu, Kununurra, Wallal Downs, Lombadina, Derby, Bidyadanga, Mandora, Dampier Peninsula, Dampier, Media, Kuri Bay, Mitchell Plateau, Doongan, Mt Elizabeth, Lake Argyle, Warmup, Durack.
2 – Pilbara: Port Hedland, Exmouth, Onslow, Karratha, Roebourne, West Roebourne, Newman, Tom Price, Paraburdoo, Marble Bar, Telfer, Roy Hill, Pannawonica, Wigttenoom, Indee, Goldsworthy, Pardoo, Shay Gap, Dampier, Barrow Island, Nyang, Cane, Learmonth, Karijini, Mardie. 
3 – Gascoyne: Carnarvon, Denham, Shark Bay, Meekatharra, Gascoyne Junction, Useless Loop, Murchison, Yalgoo, Cue, Mount Magnet, Sandstone, Cue, Peak Hill, Paynes Find, Evanston. 
4 – Goldfields: Kalgoorlie, Leinster, Leonora, Boulder, Norseman, Laverton, Coolgardie, Bandya, Sir Samuel, Lawlers, Kookynie, Higginsville, Wiluna. 
5 – Eucla: Eucla, Forrest, Eyre, Balgair, Haig, Caiguna, 
6 – Northern Interior: Balgo Hills, Bamboo Creek. 
7 – Southern Interior: Giles, Warburton, Wingellina, Carnegie.

South West Land Division:
8 – Central West: Geraldton, Dongala, Kalbarri, Morawa, Bunjil, Coorow, Jurien Bay, Leeman, Moora, Calingiri, Bolgart, New Norcia, Dandaragan, Canna, Binnu, Northampton, North Island. 
9 – Lower West: Perth, Gingin, Maundering, Bullsbrook, Mandurah, Herron, Waroona, Rockingam, Rottnest Island, Hillarys, Lancelin, Jandakot, golden Bay, Coolup, Serpentine, Byford, Gosnells, Garden Island, Halls Head, Preston Beach, Scarborough, Two Rocks, Dwellingup. 
10 – South West: Cape Naturaliste, Cape Leeuwin, Windy Harbour, Northcliffe, Manjimup, Bridgetown, Mullalyup, Donnybrook, Collie, Harvey, Busselton, Walpole.
11 – South Coastal: Denmark, Borden, Gnowangerup, Napier, Albany, Manypeaks, Bremer Bay, Jacup, Jerramungup, Mount Barker, Wellstead.
12 – South East Coastal: Esperance, Hopetoun, Ravensthorpe, Grass Patch, Scaddan, Condingup, Salmon Gums, Beaumont.
13 – Great Southern: Lake Grace, Katanning, Narrogin, Cranbrook, Kojonup, Wagin, Boddington, Hastings, Brockton, Corrigin, Hyden, Newdegate, Dumbleyung, Train Rock, Harrismith, Mount Madden, Williams. 
14 – Central Wheat Belt: Merredin, York, Northam, Goomalling, Beacon, Southern Cross, Dalwallinu, Goodlands, Yorkakine, West Golleton, Bruce Rock, Babkin, Quairading, Beverley, Wubin, Koolyanobbing. 

Western Australia is arguably the most diverse State for weather, so sometimes its important to to group large areas, particularly in the South or in the Far North for widespread severe weather. Cold fronts in Winter can impact Southern and South West WA which may include any of the following: South West, Lower West, Southern Coastal, Great Southern, Central Wheat Belt. Storms can often impact the Goldfields, Great Southern, Central Wheat Belt, South Coastal areas and this is often referred to as the Central & Southern Interior districts. Cyclones can impact the Northern districts and so the Pilbara and Kimberley will sometimes be referred to in general as “Northern WA”. Western Central WA is the Southern reaches of the Pilbara, Gascoyne and Northern parts of the Central West. 

BOM Forecast Districts for WA with the Mining & Pastoral + South West Land Division sectors identified.

 

Know Your District! (Western Australia)2019-07-22T00:39:55+10:00
21 07, 2019

Know Your District! (Northern Territory)

2019-07-21T23:59:06+10:00

When it comes to severe weather, regardless of the type of the scenario, one of the age old questions we receive on Higgins Storm Chasing, as well as any other weather page across the globe is ‘Will this affect me at x”. Generally ‘districts’ or much broader areas are labelled rather than specific towns. This is largely due to weather being unpredictable down to the nearest town and weather systems being quite large which means their potential is spread over hundreds of kilometres. Its also due to there sometimes being so many town, that the list would be far too long for it to be beneficial. Some setups or systems are easier to predict than others, but even in those situations, districts or parts of a district (i.e Southern NT, Northern NT, North West or North East NT) are labelled. 

 

The Northern Territory has 9 forecast districts according to the Bureau of Meteorology. These districts along with SOME of their respective towns include (Obviously not all towns are named, but if you recognise a nearby town, then chances are you are included in that district):
1 – Darwin-Daly: Darwin, Berrimah, Wagait Beach, Batchelor, Wangi Falls, Adelaide River, Wadeye, Plump, Dorisvale, Cooinda, Pine Creek, Berry Springs, Florence Falls, Tjaynera Falls, Noonamah, Humpty Doo, Howard Springs, Leanyer, Nightlife, Coolalinga.
2 – Tiwi: Pirlangimpi, Wurrumiyanga, Milikapiti, Nguiu, Bathurst Island, 
3 – Arnhem: Nhulunbuy, Busman, Twin Falls, Minjilang, Galiwinku, Warruwi, Maningrida, Ngukurr, Jim Jim Falls, Jabiru, Ubirr, Gunlom, Milingimbi, Groote Eylandt, North East Island, Alyangula, Numbulwar, Cape Shield, Cape Wilberforce, Cape Wessel, Gove, Ramingining.
4 – Carpentaria: Katherine, Borroloola, Wollogorang, Daly Waters, Mataranka, Centre Island, McArthur River, Larrimah.

5 – Gregory: Victoria River Downs, Timber Creek, Kidman Springs, Lajamanu, Wave Hill, Newry, Daguragu.
6 – Barkly: Tennant Creek, Elliott, Cresswell Downs, Barrow Creek, Ali Curung, Alpurrurulam, Ampilatwatja, Burnett Downs.
7 – Simpson: Alice Springs, Jervois, Ti Tree, Kulgera, Titjikala, Santa Teresa, Ross River, Arltunga, Engawala, Territory Grape Farm, Finke.
8 – Lasseter: Uluru / Yulara, Docker River, Curtin Springs, Watarrka, Hermannsburg, Papaya, Xulungurru, Mereenie, Areyonga, Kintore, Haasts Bluff.
9 – Tanami: Rabbit Flat, Yuendumu. 

 

There are a lot of conflicting boundaries for the Northern Territory, the above list seems to fit the most common and more importantly it follows the Bureau of Meteorology in which we are talking specifically about forecast districts. There is an exceptional amount of space between some towns in districts – for example, there are really only 2 towns in the Tanami district which covers 30%+ of Western NT area. This is why the NT is one of the more favourable regions to group. The Northern NT consists of the Darwin-Daly, Tiwi and Arnhem districts as well as any further districts North of and including the town of Katherine in the Carpentaria district. The North East consists of anywhere that borders the Gulf of Carpentaria Coastline while Southern NT areas include anywhere South of Tennant Creek which favours mostly the Simpson, Lasseter and Tanami districts.

The Northern Territory Districts according to BOM in relation to district forecasting.

 

Know Your District! (Northern Territory)2019-07-21T23:59:06+10:00
21 07, 2019

Know Your District! (Tasmania)

2019-07-21T20:30:11+10:00

When it comes to severe weather, regardless of the type of the scenario, one of the age old questions we receive on Higgins Storm Chasing, as well as any other weather page across the globe is ‘Will this affect me at x”. Generally ‘districts’ or much broader areas are labelled rather than specific towns. This is largely due to weather being unpredictable down to the nearest town and weather systems being quite large which means their potential is spread over hundreds of kilometres. Its also due to there sometimes being so many town, that the list would be far too long for it to be beneficial. Some setups or systems are easier to predict than others, but even in those situations, districts or parts of a district (i.e Southern TAS, Western TAS, North West TAS) are labelled. 

Tasmania has 11 forecast districts according to the Bureau of Meteorology. These districts along with SOME of their respective towns include (Obviously not all towns are named, but if you recognise a nearby town, then chances are you are included in that district):
1 – Furneaux Islands: Whitemark, Long Island, Puncheon Island, Big Green Island, Badger Island, Mount Chappell Island, Little Dog Island, Tin Kettle Island, Clarke Island, Preservation Island, Cape Bareen Island, Loccota, Blue Rocks, Leeka, Killiecrankie, Wingaroo, Inner Sister Island, Outer Sister Island, Lackrana
2 – North East: Bridport, Scottsdale, Forester, Boobyalla, Waterhouse, Cape Portland, Eddystone, BinalongN Bay, Alberton, Herrick, Pyengena
3 – East Coast: St  Marys, St Helens, Scamander, Seymour, Bicheno, Swansea, Fingal, Buckland, Nugent, Triabunna, Coles Bay, Swanston, Lake Leake, Friendly Beaches, Dolphin Sands, Cranbrook, Avoca.
4 – Central North: Launceston, Cressy, George Town, Beaconsfield, Westbury, Melbourne, Bracknell, Holwell, Longford, Lilydale, Legana.
5 – Midlands: Ross, Oatlands, Campbell Town, Kempton, Tunbridge, Stonor, Bagdad, Kempton, Lemont, Jericho, Interlaken. 

6 – South East: Hobart, Kingston, Lauderdale, Sorell, Campania, Bridgewater, Fern Tree, Mt Wellington, Cygnet, Geeveston, Huonville, Franklin, Judbury, Southport, Dover, Old Beach, Clifton Beach, Cape Bruny, Port Arthur, Leslie Vale, Deep Bay, Eggs and Bacon Bay, Sandford, Richmond, Pontville, Dodges Ferry, Forcett, Grove, Collinsvale.
7 – Upper Derwent Valley: New Norfolk, Broadmarsh, Hamilton, Ouse, Strickland, Bradys Marsh, Ellendale, Uxbridge, Westerway, Hollow Tree, Karanja, Bushy Park, Plenty, Bothwell, Osterley, Moogara, Glenfern, Mount Lloyd. 
8 – Central Plateau: Liawenee, Lake St Clair, Cradle Valley, Bothwell, Cradle Mountain, Tarraleah, Mayberry, Miena, Breona, London Lakes, Bronte Park, Mersey Forest, Walls of Jerusalem, Lorinna, Meander. 
9 – Western: Strahan, Queenstown, Rosebery, Melaleuca, Strathgordon, Scotts Peak, Zeehan, Luina, Waratah, Maatsuyker Island, Lake Gordon, Gormanston, Renison Bell, Macquarie heads, Elliott Bay. 
10 – North West Coast: Smithton, Ulverstone, Wynyard, Burnie, Deloraine, Devonport, Yolla, Luncheon Hill, Marrawah, Woolnorth, Sheffield, Wilmot, Hampshire, Abbotsham, Melrose, Stoodley, Floerdale, Sistsr Beach, Edcumbe Beach, Wiltshire, Forest. 
11 – King Island: Currie, Lymbwood, Pearshape, Grassy, Surprise Bay, Sea Elephant, Naracoopa, Reeker, Dungaree, Wickham, Egg Lagoon.

Tasmania is a unique State in that most districts are generally named after their location. However.. in some circumstances we will group the Western half of the State together which will include the West Coast, North West, King Island, Western parts of the Central Plateau. The Central Plateau can sometimes be also named the “Central Highlands” when referring to snow, and this will also incorporate the Midlands district, Southern parts of the Central North (South of Launceston) and the Upper Derwent Valley. The South East in a general sense may include the East Coast (Southern parts of the it), Southern parts of the West Coast, the South East district and parts of the Upper Derwent Valley as well as any offshore Islands.

Outline of the Tasmania South East District including Hobart Metropolitan area with many town names included. Base image via Weatherzone

 

Know Your District! (Tasmania)2019-07-21T20:30:11+10:00
21 07, 2019

Know Your District! (South Australia)

2019-07-21T21:00:57+10:00

When it comes to severe weather, regardless of the type of the scenario, one of the age old questions we receive on Higgins Storm Chasing, as well as any other weather page across the globe is ‘Will this affect me at x”. Generally ‘districts’ or much broader areas are labelled rather than specific towns. This is largely due to weather being unpredictable down to the nearest town and weather systems being quite large which means their potential is spread over hundreds of kilometres. Its also due to there sometimes being so many town, that the list would be far too long for it to be beneficial. Some setups or systems are easier to predict than others, but even in those situations, districts or parts of a district (i.e Northern SA, South Eastern SA, Western SA) are labelled. 

 

 

South Australia has 15 forecast districts according to the Bureau of Meteorology. These districts along with SOME of their respective towns include (Obviously not all towns are named, but if you recognise a nearby town, then chances are you are included in that district):
1 – Adelaide Metropolitan: Adelaide, Elizabeth, Glenelg, Noarlunga, Mount Barker, Edinburgh, Mount Crawford, Salisbury, Grange, North Have, Buckland Park, Tea Tree Gully.
2 – Mount Lofty Ranges: Parawa, Stirling, Strathalbyn, Nuriootpa, Victor Harbor, Mount Lofty, Sellicks Beach, Williamstown, Gawler, Coromandel Valley, Bridgewater, Mount Compass, Harrogate, Palmer, Mount Pleasant, Eden Valley, Gawler.
3 – Yorke Peninsula: Kadina, Minlaton, Stenhouse Bay, Edithburgh, Maitland, Cape Willoughby, Warooka, Bute, Bluff Beach, Ardrossan, Kulpara, Port Broughton. 
4 – Kangaroo Island: Kingscote, Parndana, Cuttlefish Bay, Seal Bay, Gosse, Cassini, North Cape, Stokes Bay, Cape Borda, Flinders Chase, Karatta.
5 – Upper South East: Keith, Bordertown, Meningie, Salt Creek, Willalooka, Coonalpyn. 
6 – Lower South East: Robe, Coonawarra, Naracoorte, Mount Gambier, Padthaway, Cape Jaffa, Penola, Lucinda, Beachport.

 

7 – Murraylands: Lameroo, Karoonda, Murray Bridge, Varuna, Coomandook, Milang, Asheville, Mannum, Swan Reach, Alawoona. 
8 – Riverland: Renmark, Morgan, Waikerie, Blanchetown, Wunkar, Loxton, Berri,
9 – Mid North: Roseworthy, Clare, Jamestown, Port Pirie, Snowtown, Roverstown, Eudunda, Kaunda, Balaclava, Spalding, Crystal Brook, Mallala, Angle Vale.
10 – Flinders: Hawker, Port Augusta, Melrose, Peterborough, Orroroo, Carrieton, Blinman.
11 – West Coast: Ceduna, Nullarbor, Cook, Streaky Bay, Wudinna, Yalata, Lock, Port Kenny, Elliston, Minima.
12 – Eastern Eyre Peninsula: Kimba, Cleve, Whyalla, Contra, Iron Baron, Cowell, Arno Bay, Rudall, 
13 – Lower Eyre Peninsula: Cummins, Coffin Bay, Port Lincoln, Butler, Port Neill, Tumby Bay, Karkoo.
14 – North West Pastoral: Woomera, Roxby Downs, Tarcoola, Coober Pedy, Ernabella, Marla, Oak Valley, Iron Knob, Nonning, 
15 – North East Pastoral: Moomba, Marree, Oodnadatta, Leigh Creek, Yunta, Innamincka, Mingary, Manna Hill, Beltana, Farina, Merty Merty.

 

 

Often districts are grouped into larger categories. Some examples of this happening in South Australian areas – ‘Northern’ which consists of both Pastoral districts as well as ares North of Port Augusta. ‘Western’ which includes the West Coast, North West Pastoral and Western parts of the Eyre Peninsula. South Eastern, which includes the Lower & Upper South East, Murraylands and any further areas East and South of the Mt Lofty Ranges. Due to the vastness of rural South Australia, these groupings are used far more often than in some other States, as there are large areas between some towns so its far easier to group them. 

 

Outline of the Adelaide Metropolitan district with many town names included. Base image via Weatherzone

 

Know Your District! (South Australia)2019-07-21T21:00:57+10:00
21 07, 2019

Know Your District! (Victoria)

2019-07-21T21:01:03+10:00

When it comes to severe weather, regardless of the type of the scenario, one of the age old questions we receive on Higgins Storm Chasing, as well as any other weather page across the globe is ‘Will this affect me at x”. Generally ‘districts’ or much broader areas are labelled rather than specific towns. This is largely due to weather being unpredictable down to the nearest town and weather systems being quite large which means their potential is spread over hundreds of kilometres. Its also due to there sometimes being so many town, that the list would be far too long for it to be beneficial. Some setups or systems are easier to predict than others, but even in those situations, districts or parts of a district (i.e Coastal parts of VIC or areas West of the Ranges) are labelled. 

 

 

Victoria has 9 forecast districts according to the Bureau of Meteorology. These districts along with SOME of their respective towns include (Obviously not all towns are named, but if you recognise a nearby town, then chances are you are included in that district):
1 – Mallee: Mildura, Swan Hill, Ouyen, Hopetoun, Donald, Charlton, Berriwillock, Cowangie, Kerang, Manangatang, Robinvale, Tooleybuc, Cohuna, Red Cliffs, Liparoo, Walpeup
2 – Wimmera: Horsham, Nhill, Edenhope, St Arnaud, Stawell, Warracknabeal, Rainbow, Yanac, Mockinya, Paradise, Kellalac, The Grampians, Longerenong, Pyrenees, Ben Nevis, Kanagulk, Halls Gap.
3 – Northern Country: Bendigo, Echuca, Shepparton, Rochester, Kyabram, Cobram, Euroa, Heathcote, Wedderbum, Pyramid Hill, Barraport, Femihurst, Inglewood, Tatura, Yarrawonga, Mulwala. 
4 – North East: Mount Buller, Mount Hotham, Falls Creek, Darmouth, Dinner Plain, Mansfield, Benalla, Beechworth, Corowa, Wangaratta, Wodonga, Corryong, Rutherglen, Myrtelford.
5 – East Gippsland: Bairnsdale, Lakes Entrance, Mallacoota, Orbost, Point Hicks, Mount Nowa Nowa, Gelantipy, Combienbar, Paynesville, Glenaladale, Bullumwaal, Omeo, Cabbage Tree Creek, Bemm River, Cann River. 

 

Central Victoria highlighted, including Greater Melbourne. Base image via Weatherzone

 

6 – West & South Gippsland: Latrobe Valley, Sale, Rawson, Moe, Churchill, Traralgon, Yarram, Leongatha, Foster, Yanakie, Seaspray, Loch Sport, Mt Moornapa. 
7 – Central (includes Melbourne Metropolitan): Melbourne City, Essendon, Geelong, Ballarat, Kyneton, Meredith, Torquay, Lorne, Ocean Grove, Frankston, Sunbury, Doreen, Healesville, Brighton, Port Phillip Bay, Lara, Creswick, Daylesford, Bacchus Marsh, Melton, Glen Waverley, Lancefield, Craigieburn, Wonga Park, Coldstream, Beaconsfield, Emerald, Pakenham, Koo Wee Rup, Coronet Bay, Cape Paterson, Wonthaggi, Hastings, Mornington, Sorrento.
8 – North Central: Maryborough, Castlemaine, Dunolly, Yea, Kilmore, Alexandra, Seymour, Wallan, Marysville, Flowerdale, Bradford, Eildon, Buxton. 
9 – South West: Warrnambool, Colac, Hamilton, Dartmoor, Portland, Port Fairy, Mortlake, Casterton, Cape Otway, Ararat, Beaufort, Skipton, Lismore, Camperdown, Dundonnell, Terang, Avoca. 

 

 

Often districts are grouped into larger categories. Some examples of this happening in Victoria area – ‘Inland’ which consists of all areas North of Greater Melbourne and West of the Victoria Alpine region. ‘Western’ which consists of areas West of Greater Melbourne and Yarrawonga. ‘Eastern’ which consists of the Gippsland and North East (Victorian Alps) of the State. Coastal which consists of the Gippsland, South West and Greater Melbourne districts. 

 

Broader ‘combined’ districts across VIC – coloured text matches colour coded boxes. Note: Boxes are overlapping into SA & NSW (those States aren’t included in this). Base image via Weatherzone

 

Know Your District! (Victoria)2019-07-21T21:01:03+10:00