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19 02, 2018

Tropical Cyclone Gita to cause Widespread Severe Weather across NZ

Tropical Cyclone Gita is remaining on track to cause widespread severe weather across New Zealand over the next 48-72 hours as it directly crosses over the Country. Above image – Winds on Tuesday afternoon via Windy

 

 

Tropical Cyclone Gita is currently a Category 2 tropical cyclone East of Lord Howe Island in the Tasman Sea. Over the next 24 hours, the system is expected to maintain its strength, if not slightly intensify as it transitions into an extratropical cyclone (thats a cyclone which is transitioning into non-tropical waters) before it makes landfall over the Northern parts of the South Island later on Tuesday.

 

Tropical Cyclone Gita track map via JTWC

Tropical Cyclone Gita track map via JTWC

 

 

The system, while its not expected to be as severe or even remotely prolonged as Fehi was to the South Island and Southern parts of the North Island.. it is still expected to impact the same areas with widespread falls of 100-200mm which are likely to cause flash flooding along with some creek and river rises which may lead to localised sustained flooding. Damaging winds are expected to become widespread across the Southern half of the North Island, Western North Island Coast and the majority of the South Island along with localised destructive winds of 125km/h+ over the South Island Southern Alps and Cook Strait. A large swell of 6m+ is likely to spread through Cook Strait with waves of 4-7m over the Western Coast of both Islands and the East Coast of the South Island on Wednesday.

 

 

While this isn’t an overly dangerous system or as long lived, its still likely to cause widespread severe weather which could impact the daily lives of highly populated areas. It may also cause transit issues with trees down over roads, roads closed due to flooding and hazardous driving conditions. So its important to not be complacent with this system.

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3 02, 2018

Record Cold hits South Eastern QLD!

South East QLD has endured its coldest February period in more than 100 years, breaking several records, some of which are long standing! Above image via BSCH – live 6pm temperatures.

 

 

South East QLD in Summer is typically warm, sometimes very hot, and muggy. Thats what it has been all Summer so far… until the last 2 days, which have seen the Seasons almost reversed with a return of showers, rain periods (mostly light in intensity) and COLD!

The widespread thick cloud coverage, mixed with Southerly winds (mostly light over land, but very gusty off the Coast) and consistent shower activity has lead to the region recording its coldest February period in more than a century!

The cold was kicked off on Friday (yesterday) with Toowoomba (15.4ºc), Stanthorpe (15.0ºc) and Warwick (16.9ºc) recording their coldest February days on record. Brisbane, Ipswich and the majority of SEQLD struggled to get over 20ºc. Brisbane officially recording 21.7ºc. Saturday was even coldest for those East of the Ranges… Brisbane maxed just before 11am with a chilling 21.2ºc, this is the coldest February day since 1917 (101 years) and the coldest pair of February days (21.7ºc and 21.2ºc) since 1917 also. Today’s top of just 21.2ºc is actually colder than average for June, July and August in Brisbane!

 

11am temperatures and radar via Weatherzone for South East QLD.

11am temperatures and radar via Weatherzone for South East QLD.

 

 

Amberley (20.3ºc), Kingaroy (18.0ºc), Oakey (18.4ºc), Redcliffe (21.7ºc), Beaudesert (21.0ºc), Gympie (20.4ºc), Gayndah (19.7ºc), Maryborough (21.3ºc), Gold Coast (21.2ºc), Nambour (21.0ºc) all recorded their coldest February days, with Dalby (18.5ºc) just 0.1ºc shy of the record set at the old station back in 1940 and Gatton (20.3ºc) just 0.2ºc shy of the current record. Tewantin’s 22.0ºc was only 0.4ºc shy of their record which is impressive given records date back to 1895! If Toowoomba didn’t break their record yesterday, then today’s feat would have anyway also.

 

 

For the majority of people, its not just the cold… but the rain. The last 48hrs has generally seen more rain fall than all of January combined. This has been most noted over places like the Darling Downs and Maranoa where falls of 50mm+ are becoming widespread, as well as the Sunshine Coast and Wide Bay. Places like Toowoomba who had a record dry January with 8mm, have already seen 30mm+. 

 

24hr rainfall totals to 9am Saturday via BOM

24hr rainfall totals to 9am Saturday via BOM

 

31 01, 2018

Generous Monsoon breaks Tropical Records!

It was the monsoon that kept on giving, and now for MANY locations its delivered not only some of the best rain in years… but its actually broken LONG STANDING January records! Heres a breakdown of how the month transpired… Above image via BOM (Monthly rainfall colour map)


The monsoon came through in 2 different waves, one earlier in the month that lasted around a week or so, the second towards the end of the month which lasted about the last 2 weeks. There was no real break in between the two which helped keep the rainfall build up going, and for those who missed out on one day… the dome eventually broke. Cyclone Joyce was an added bonus for the NW NT and Northern WA region, while a series of tropical lows helped boost the Northern QLD totals, and a deep tropical low brought phenomenal rainfall to WA.

 

Forecast mid level winds via EC showing 3 tropical low's situated along the Monsoon Trough on Wednesday (January 24th) via Windy

Forecast mid level winds via EC showing 3 tropical low’s situated along the Monsoon Trough on Wednesday (January 24th) via Windy

 

Thats all well and good to have the above, but it always comes down to numbers with these kinds of accumulative setups, so what were the numbers really like (note, bolded locations and totals indicates a new January or All-Time Record)?

More than 1000mm fell in a few locations
Kangaroo Flats (SE of Darwin) (NT) 1185mm

West Roebuck (WA) 1073mm
Mount Bundey South (NT) 1026mm

For these areas, Kangaroo Flats recorded an insane 4 straight days of 100mm+ (the only location to do so), as well as 6 days above 100mm for the month (again the only location). West Roebuck recorded the highest daily total in the country with 449mm and 673mm in just 5 days.

 

The deep tropical low (Invest 90P) which delivered over 400mm to Broome and West Roebuck in 24hrs, and 600mm+ in a week to the NW NT

The deep tropical low (Invest 90P) which delivered over 400mm to Broome and West Roebuck in 24hrs, and 600mm+ in a week to the NW NT

 

 

The more populated areas were hit with falls of 800-1000mm which brought flash and some river/creek flooding.
• Bing Bong Port (NT) 967.6mm

Milingimbi (NT) 933.8mm
Broome (WA) 915.6mm
Channel Point (NT) 908mm
Centre Island (NT) 891.2mm
• Darwin (NT) 857.2mm
• Scherger RAAF (QLD) 819.6mm
Ngayawili (NT) 817.6mm

Within these areas, Scherger RAAF recorded 351.8mm in the last 2 days of the month, Centre Island scored 534mm in 4 days. Broome cracked 673mm in 5 days which included their second highest daily total on record of 412mm and Darwin amassed 637mm in the last 10 days of the month. Bing Bong Port was also the only location to record 2 200mm days.

 

Weekly NT Rainfall via BOM

Weekly NT Rainfall via BOM

 

 

Further significant rainfall was also recorded across remaining parts of the NT and across the Tropics of QLD with scattered falls of 500mm (not every 500mm total is included here because there are a heap of them).
• Weipa (QLD) 704.8mm

• Derby (WA) 683.2mm
• Hazelmere (QLD) 680.5mm
• Borroloola (NT) 666.2mm

• Cairns Airport (QLD) 664.6mm
• Bidyadanga (WA) 608.7mm
• Mornington Island (QLD) 595.4mm

• Cooktown (QLD) 579.6mm
• Cairns City (QLD) 552mm
• Coconut Island (QLD) 540.2mm

Curtin (NT) 517.6mm
• South Johnstone (QLD) 510.2mm

In these areas, Hazelmere amassed 320mm in 1 day, Cooktown 241mm in 1 day, Weipa 371mm in the last 2 days of the month. Derby scored 2 200mm+ 4 day blocks, which helps show that it wasn’t a one hit wonder. While Cairns got 3 days of more than 100mm helping it become the wettest January since 2010.

 

Monthly rainfall over Tropical NQLD. Red circle indicates the first monsoon burst, the purple circle indicates the 2nd monsoon burst. Image via BOM

Monthly rainfall over Tropical NQLD. Red circle indicates the first monsoon burst, the purple circle indicates the 2nd monsoon burst. Image via BOM

 

30 01, 2018

Damaging Cyclone then Snow forecast for New Zealand

New Zealand is currently on the brink of experiencing one of the most damaging weather systems for rest of 2018 as a series of systems combines over the Country! Above image: Winds for Thursday via Windy

 

Tropical Cyclone Fehi (Category 1) is currently positioned SW of New Caledonia in the Eastern Coral Sea. The system is maintaining Category 1 strength as it tracks towards the South. While that may seem tame, the system is about to undergo a dramatic transformation. An upper level trough over Eastern Australia is forecast to combine with the systems it enters the Tasman Sea. This will transition the system from a typical warm-cored tropical cyclone into a less common cold-core sub-tropical cyclone. What that means is the system will rapidly intensify and grow in size! 

Severe weather outlook via the NZ Metservice

Severe weather outlook via the NZ Metservice

 

 

Its during Thursday that the system will start to impact New Zealand as it crosses the South Island as an “equivalent” of a Category 2 or 3 cyclone-strength system. Models are in agreement that destructive to very destructive winds are likely to lash the South Island and in particular the Alpine region and West Coast with winds between 140 and 170km/h highly likely, higher peak gusts are possible too! On top of that, its likely the system will dump an excessive amount of rainfall with widespread falls of 100-200mm likely over the South Island and higher falls of 200-400mm over the Alps and West Coast. This will likely cause significant flash flooding in some areas along with creek and river flooding! To add to that, residents along the West Coast should be mindful for both the swell and storm surge… waves between 7 and 10m are likely to lash the West Coast with higher peak waves of up to 14m. This combined with high tides and a storm surge will likely cause inundations along the Coastal fringe.

Forecast rainfall via Windy for New Zealand. Orange >100mm, pink/purple >250mm!

Forecast rainfall via Windy for New Zealand. Orange >100mm, pink/purple >250mm!

 

Once the system moves through by Friday, the South Island is then expected to be pummelled by snow over the weekend as freezing air from Antarctica is dragged up behind the system and interacts with increased moisture. Falls of 20-40cm are likely over the Alps with hail showers over the remainder of the South Island possible. Its actually going to be cold enough for frost too in the morning, if the wind can settle. 

While the focus will be on the South Island for obvious reason, parts of the North Island are also expected to cop heavy rain and strong to damaging winds (mostly around Wellington / through the channel and over the West Coast).

Forecast snowfall via Windy for NZ over the weekend!

Forecast snowfall via Windy for NZ over the weekend!

 

30 01, 2018

Super Blue Blood Moon Total Lunar Eclipse for Australia!

Australia is set to have a front row seat to one of the rarest events astronomers have come to know. A very rare, super blue blood moon lunar eclipse. Its an event that is lucky to occur once every 1 to 2 generations and tomorrow night is that moment.

 

 

So what is it first… 
The name seems a bit farfetched and made up, but its not. Its the combination of several uncommon occurrences coming together at once. A blue moon is when a full moon occurs twice in a single month (January 1/2 and January 30/31). A lunar eclipse is when the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow and a super-moon is the name given when the moon’s closest approach to Earth in a single orbit occurs during a full moon. All of those things are coming together at once… basically, a full moon which is occurring for the 2nd time this month, is coming as close to the Earth as possible whilst crossing through its shadow. Seeing it is as unbelievable as the name, and its something you’ll never ever forget. So when can you see it?

 


These are the following times per region (January 31st):

• Queensland (inc. Brisbane): Partial Eclipse: 9:48pm, Deeper Shadow: 10:30pm, Total Eclipse: 10:51pm
• NSW, VIC, ACT, TAS (inc. Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Hobart): Partial: 10:48pm, Deeper Shadow: 11:30pm, Total: 11:51pm
• South Australia (inc. Adelaide): Partial: 10:18pm, Deeper Shadow: 11pm, Total Eclipse: 11:21pm
• Northern Territory (inc. Darwin): Partial: 9:18pm, Deeper Shadow: 10pm, Total Eclipse: 10:21pm
• Western Australia (inc. Perth): Partial: 7:48pm, Deeper Shadow: 8:30pm, Total Eclipse: 8:51pm

Note: The majority of the event will be in the build up, it will only take 77mins for the moon to return to normal following a peak eclipse, but the “drama” won’t be there. So if you cant stay up, try and at least watch the build up which is at a more reasonable hour.

Forecast times for the event courtesy of Tom Harradine

Forecast times for the event courtesy of Tom Harradine

 

Now all of this depends on cloud coverage too. Unfortunately its not good news for many people. The majority of the NT is forecast to be covered in cloud, as is the majority of South Australia, Inland & most of Coastal NSW, NW VIC, Northern and Eastern TAS + the majority of Inland QLD. The only places really being favourable for clearer skies will be the WA W and SW Coast’s, Tasmania, Central VIC and the Coastal fringe of QLD between Mackay and the Gold Coast. Its still worth going out though just in case, you will only need a 20min window of opportunity to see this event unfold.

Forecast cloud coverage for 10pm AEST via BSCH (just prior to the total lunar eclipse)

Forecast cloud coverage for 10pm AEST via BSCH (just prior to the total lunar eclipse)

 

24 01, 2018

Vile Australia Day Weekend Heatwave for SE AUS

South East Australia is set to prepare for another scorching heatwave with maximums likely to climb back into the mid to high 40’s for some! Above image – forecast temperatures via Windy (EC) for Sunday (Aqua >45ºc, grey >40ºc).

 

 

A low pressure trough is set to become established across Southern and South East Australia over the Australia Day weekend sparking another heatwave as it helps draw in very hot air from the WA Pilbara and NT across the region leading to temperatures skyrocketing! This comes after the region (SA, VIC, Inland NSW & TAS) has had next to no break from the past 2 heatwaves which have moved through over the last 7 to 10 days.

 

BOM Heatwave Pilot for Friday, Saturday, Sunday

BOM Heatwave Pilot for Friday, Saturday, Sunday

 

Across South Australia the heat is really expected to pick up on Friday with maximums into the high 40’s over Northern districts and high 30’s / low 40’s elsewhere. During Saturday the majority of the State is expected to see 40ºc+ before a cool change starts to impact some of the Western districts on Sunday bringing localised relief… not before the rest of the State sees another 40ºc+ day. Even Adelaide itself is going for 38ºc on Friday before 42ºc on both Saturday and Sunday.

 

Forecast Maximums for SA on Friday via BSCH / OCF

Forecast Maximums for SA on Friday via BSCH / OCF

SA Forecast Maximums for Saturday via BSCH / OCF

SA Forecast Maximums for Saturday via BSCH / OCF

For NSW, VIC and TAS it’ll be warm on Friday with temperatures well above average, but the heat is expected to really kick up over the weekend with temperatures climbing into the low to mid 40’s through North West VIC and Inland NSW. Closer to the coast it’ll be just as hot with Melbourne going for possibly 40ºc on Sunday and Sydney’s West is expected to see the mid to high 30’s also. TAS could be the surprise of the lot with maximums expected to reach the mid to possibly high 30’s over the weekend, to be honest someone could hit 40ºc. 

 

 

Like every other heatwave at this time of year, its not uncommon, its just with Australia Day celebrations going off, people outdoors in parks and beaches having fun and enjoying this great sunburnt country of ours… along with the consumption of alcohol, the risk of heat stress and heat related illness will dramatically increase. So please take the necessary precautions to have a great, but safe weekend!

 

NSW & VIC Forecast Maximums for Saturday via BSCH / OCF

NSW & VIC Forecast Maximums for Saturday via BSCH / OCF

 

22 01, 2018

Monsoon Rain to drench NQLD as Tropical Low develops!

Over the past week, parts of Tropical North QLD have seen more than 500mm… over the next week the Tropics could see more than that, with Coastal parts of QLD seeing a return of the wet weather as the monsoon trough intensifies! Above image via BOM (8 day rainfall)

 

 

The monsoon trough is expected to remain stubborn and firmly positioned over Tropical North QLD, slowly intensifying as the week progresses. This trough is expected to very slowly move towards the South and “could” reach as far South as Townsville or Bowen later in the week. That all depends on a few factors though.

The first factor is a tropical low which is currently situated over the North East NT. This low is expected to meander over the region and help produce enhanced rainfall due to onshore Northerly flow over the Gulf Coast. Falls of 200-400mm are likely with isolated falls of more than 700mm possible over the Gulf Coast (this may end up being over water and not land, but the totals are being put out there). The heaviest falls are likely between Monday and Thursday.

 

EC model 10-day rainfall via Windy showing 50mm+ (yellow) for CQLD, 100mm+ (orange) for NQLD, 250mm+ (pink) and 500mm+ (grey)

EC model 10-day rainfall via Windy showing 50mm+ (yellow) for CQLD, 100mm+ (orange) for NQLD, 250mm+ (pink) and 500mm+ (grey)

 

 

Along the Tropical North QLD Coast, further scattered showers, rain areas and thunderstorms are likely over the course of the week resulting in rainfall totals gradually accumulating. Isolated falls of 100mm+ are possible on some days, however the overall weekly outlook for areas North of Townsville is for falls of 100-200mm and isolated higher falls possible. Further South, areas from Townsville to Rockhampton may be influenced by the development of a tropical low. All models have this low developing, however its track is unknown yet. Its not expected to develop into a tropical cyclone… but that won’t stop it producing scattered showers along the Central QLD Coast and further enhanced falls through areas North of Bowen where 25-50mm is likely and isolated falls to 100mm are possible.

Over the course of the upcoming weekend, SEQLD should see a return to the wet stuff with falls of 15-30mm possible.

 

GFS model showing a Tropical Low off the NQLD Coast during Thursday via Windy

GFS model showing a Tropical Low off the NQLD Coast during Thursday via Windy

 

21 01, 2018

Twin Tropical Low’s to increase the Monsoon’s impact!

After scattered falls of 100-300mm+ over Far North QLD and the Northern NT over the past few days, it looks like twin tropical low’s are forecast to combine with a stubborn monsoon trough to produce another drenching of a week! Above image via Windy showing the next 10 days rainfall.

 

The monsoon trough and deep monsoon flow have become evident over the Northern Tropics over the past few days with large parts of the NT Tropics, Gulf of Carpentaria and Far North QLD recording well over 100mm, and some locations recording up to 500mm in the past 4-5 days. If forecast models are anything to go by, it looks like these totals are set to increase and become even more widespread… finally impact populated areas.

The monsoon trough is forecast to be the kicker. Its forecast by all models to not only deepen and strengthen, producing a more consistent moisture pull over the Northern half of the Country leading to more widespread rain areas and heavier rain, but its also expected to become extremely stubborn and will barely budge for the next week at least!

Forecast mid level winds via EC showing 3 tropical low's situated along the Monsoon Trough on Wednesday via Windy

Forecast mid level winds via EC showing 3 tropical low’s situated along the Monsoon Trough on Wednesday via Windy

 

Along the trough however, a weak tropical low has already been identified over the far South West Gulf of Carpentaria and this is likely to significantly enhance rainfall totals around the Gulf Coast, particularly through the Eastern NT and Far North West of QLD. Another tropical low is forecast to develop over the Joseph Bonaparte Gulf (North of the Kimberley) and move into the Kimberley towards the end of the week. This is likely to increase rainfall over the Western NT and Northern WA regions. Over the next week, another 100-200mm is expected to become widespread across the Northern half of the country and this is likely to impact populated places like Broome, Weipa, Cairns and possibly Townsville (but don’t hold us to that… Townsville has its own weather when it comes to rain). Scattered falls of 300mm+ are likely across the Coastline and this will likely impact the Gulf Coast and the NT Coast including Darwin. Isolated falls of 500mm+ are likely over the Gulf Coast including Mornington Island where potential falls of more than 800mm being indicated by several models!

BOM 8 day rainfall

BOM 8 day rainfall

 

 

It may have been a slow start to the season for many places, but it looks like January is going to try its best to make up for that and more! At this stage there are no indicators of tropical cyclone developments over the next week… but lets just enjoy the rain first!

Forecast Rainfall via OCF (totals can be doubled due to conservative outputs) for Saturday as the second Tropical Low impacts WA - image via BSCH

Forecast Rainfall via OCF (totals can be doubled due to conservative outputs) for Saturday as the second Tropical Low impacts WA – image via BSCH

 

20 01, 2018

100 years on from the ‘Mackay’ Cyclone!

100 years ago today, on January 20th 1918, Mackay was directly hit by one of the worst Tropical Cyclones in not only Queensland, but Australian history. Heres a rundown of how the unnamed beast brought havoc to the Whitsundays! Above image was the eventual track over Mackay via Harden Up

 

 

In 1918, technology certainly wasn’t as capable or high tech as it is today. The naming tradition of tropical systems in Australia was already in full swing, however with limited man power, there was only one man responsible at the Bureau of Meteorology. He happened to be away on holidays during this period and so the story is told about how one of the most famous Queensland cyclones went nameless!

 

River Street, Mackay following the Cyclone. Image via the State Library

River Street, Mackay following the Cyclone. Image via the John Oxley Library

 

Its believed the eye of the system crossed a few kilometres North of Mackay on the evening of Sunday, January 20th 1918. This unfortunately meant the city of Mackay was in the full impact zone where it was buffeted by very destructive Category 4 strength winds. The system is believed to have crossed the Coast at its peak strength, and was still intensifying upon landfall after steamrolling in from the North East, over Mackay and inland towards Emerald. 

 

Sydney Street, Mackay looking South following the landfall of the Mackay Cyclone. Image via Bonzle (HERE)

Sydney Street, Mackay looking South following the landfall of the Mackay Cyclone. Image via Bonzle (HERE)

 

 

While the winds themselves caused havoc, what this cyclone became famous for was the 3.6m tidal surge which came through Mackay like a tsunami. EVERY building in Mackay City was damaged and more than 1000 buildings were destroyed. This tidal surge also impacted lives, with at least 30 people being tragically killed – some bodies were found as far away as Rockhampton and Yeppoon after being caught in the historic flooding. The recently (at the time) constructed town hall was the only building people could seek refuge in following the disaster.

 

View from the Grand Hotel following the landfall of the Mackay Cyclone. Image via the Mackay Museum

View from the Grand Hotel following the landfall of the Mackay Cyclone. Image via the Mackay Museum

 

To add insult to injury, the system brought with in astronomical rainfall which STILL to this day is a record for Mackay. Mackay Post Office took all weather recordings at the time (temperature and rainfall). Mackay avoided the majority of rainfall over the 20th with only 12.2mm recorded to 9am 21/1/1918. In the 3 days after that, 1411.3mm was recorded. To this day, that 3 day total remains a record, the 627.4mm recorded in 24hrs remains an all-time record and almost double any other month. The 2161mm for January 1918 remains a record also. Pleystowe Sugar Mill recorded an event-record of 1499.7mm across the main 4 days, as well as 703.6mm in 1 day! 

 

The Crown Hotel at Home Hill following the destroying tidal surge and record rainfall. Image via the State Library of Queensland

The Crown Hotel at Home Hill following the destroying tidal surge and record rainfall. Image via the State Library of Queensland

 

 

The system then went on to produce widespread falls of 250-500mm across 2 days through the Central Highlands and the Northern Capricornia which resulted in record flooding across both regions including Rockhampton where along with record flooding at Rockhampton (604mm of rain in 4 days).

It was the cyclone without a name, but its forever a part of Queensland Weather history!

 

2 ships washed ashore and wrecked following the Mackay Cyclone. Image credit HERE

2 ships washed ashore and wrecked following the Mackay Cyclone. Image credit via Bonzle > HERE

 

17 01, 2018

Extensive Heatwave to Sweep SE AUS

issued Wednesday, January 17th 2018. Another extensive and excessive heatwave is forecast to sweep South East Australia including the majority of South Australia, Victoria, Tasmania and New South Wales over the next several days… potentially lasting more than a week in some areas! Above image: Temperatures via Windy for Friday afternoon (aqua >45ºc, grey >40ºc).

 

 

On Wednesday, South Australia copped the brunt of the heat with Adelaide nudging 39ºc and large parts of the North climbing into the 40’s. On Thursday and Friday however, the temperatures are expected to ramp up with Adelaide climbing up to 41ºc both days and parts of the North, especially the North East climbing into the mid to high 40’s!

During Thursday and Friday, the heat is also expected to spread Eastwards into Victoria and Tasmania. Large parts of VIC, if not the majority of VIC is expected to climb into the 40’s and this may include Melbourne City who is hinting at 39 or 40ºc. In the North West the maximum is expected to soar into the mid 40’s with places like Mildura potentially reaching 45 or 46ºc. For TAS, its cooler… but not by much for their standards with Hobart going for 32 and 31ºc respectively and parts of the Central going for 35ºc+. This is all expected prior to a cool change moving through which should eliminate the heating for the weekend.

 

OCF Forecast Maximums for Friday via BSCH

OCF Forecast Maximums for Friday via BSCH

 

 

Across NSW, its going to be a different story… again, like last time, hotter for longer. Widespread maximums are expected to climb to well above heatwave thresholds for at least 4 or 5 days, and there are signs that another heatwave may come towards the end of next week with no relief in between. Sydney is expecting a reasonable 30ºc+ for Thursday to Saturday before 35ºc on Sunday. The Western Suburbs and Inland Hunter are heading for 4 straight 40’s though. Across Inland NSW, its 40ºc+ for 4 or 5 days straight with the North West climbing into the mid to high 40’s for at least 3 of those days!

 

OCF Forecast Maximums for Sunday via BSCH

OCF Forecast Maximums for Sunday via BSCH

 

 

Yes its January, but we saw the evidence last time with dozens of people hospitalised (and worse) for heat related illness. Its a timely reminder that this heat ISNT normal, its in fact 10-15ºc above average for many areas. Its a timely reminder that its best to be smart in these situations and drink plenty of water and look after those around you. Given the prolonged nature of this heat… even healthy fit adults are at risk of heat stress!

 

Heatwave pilot via BOM for Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Heatwave pilot via BOM for Friday, Saturday, Sunday